consumerism

As Autumn descends, going hygge in everything we do seems like such a good idea. I'm wondering how the health and wellness industry will take on such a sensibly happiness-inducing concept in an industry that often seems to thrive on more than healthy amounts of self-hatred.
Yes, we need to recycle. We need big companies to be transparent about their sustainability credentials, and we need to challenge 'greenwash', but more importantly than that, we all need to be creating change ourselves. And that doesn't just mean sending an angry tweet or signing a petition. It means actual physical changes to our behaviours.
We need this in every business, every home, and every school, to shape a more active, purposeful and engaged society. And we're only going to need it more as the world changes - as robotisation advances, and as we approach the limits of our material culture and its insufficient answers to the challenges of both physical and mental wellbeing.
George Osborne pulled yet another budget-related rabbit from the famous red suitcase last month. After a cunicular living
Yesterday I woke up feeling alive and vibrant, it was another Sunday. I joyously jumped out of bed for my first cup of tea; I sat down and enjoyed a quiet moment of reflection before scrolling through my Facebook timeline.
In an attempt to refine the information overload, I have picked the articles that I think are most engaging; voices that will both inspire and anger; brands worthy of attention; and concepts that will encourage reflection on this industry and how we interact with it. Here are the five topics that dominated the discussion:
Murmurs trending that the online market site, Taobao, is supported by these quiet female shopaholics as a form of activism. Whether or not we're being too quick to place political idealization on a opportunistic convergence of the times, Taobao's wealthy owner Jack Ma is now worshipped as a deity.
This is the better meaning of Christmas: not that we receive from a supply that will never end, but that, in the dead of night, in acknowledgement of the limited resources that this world has, we recognise our common worth and equality and share what we have with those who have less.
Thanks to organisations such as WIL Uganda, the Christmas message isn't forgotten and we can still play pass the parcel. In fact, sticking one sneaky sable under the tree could be your way to multiple women's hearts this December.
Black Friday 2015 is one more evidence point. Asda, the Walmart subsidiary who brought the phenomenon to our shores, are this year among those opting out.