coping with cancer

From experience, I find that for this well proven technique to work best certain other boxes need to be ticked first. We need to be emotionally and mentally ready for CBT. Confused? Let me explain.
Having a social, cultural and religious heritage that is well saturated with guilt (at least when I grew up), shame and guilt would be a constant companion and shadow that would weigh heavily on me. The essence of the intuitive and conscious belief was that 'I am bad'.
We all need to feel safe and at times we can only get that by withdrawing into our bubble to feel anchored and grounded. Then there are those bubbles that can make us feel cut off, separate and disconnected from others and the world around us. If you really think about it, bubbles are there, for all of us, all of the time. Life can be about navigating bubbles.
Your beloved cats don't come to you on the bed, so I hear. The one called Little Sock does not part from your mother's side. Perhaps they give you space. Perhaps they have started to let you go. Your mother says she is strong, now, but does not know about after... how she will cope. She will be 80 next month. Her only child is dying.
Cancer grief is the sense of loss and bereavement experienced by those affected by cancer (including family and friends). It can start with the diagnosis and does not need a death to feel earth shatteringly real.
Undergoing cancer treatment and living with or beyond cancer is no mean feat. It can take single-minded determination to deal with treatment and its side effects, as well as life-long uncertainty and a roller coaster of unexpected mixed emotions.
Like no doubt others before and after her will make very personal and difficult choices, I get the impression Lynda Bellingham managed to make peace with cancer and herself. Perhaps we need peace to make truly positive life changing and life enhancing choices, especially when they are about our death.
When someone is diagnosed with cancer, relatives and friends are often the forgotten ones. Yet, they are also affected by the disease, may require help to cope, but may themselves think that they are not as deserving and important as the person with cancer
Ten years ago aged 37, Kylie Minogue was treated for breast cancer. In a recent TV interview on Australia's Sunday night's 60 Minutes she was asked about that time in her life. She became visibly emotional and eventually described experiencing a "mixture of emotions and memories, when you are fighting something unknown".
I definitely don't walk around everyday thinking about how beautiful post-cancer life is, I think about that bastard who pushed in front of me at Upper Crust. You are allowed to grumble, it's cathartic, just don't stomp around acting like the world owes you one.