coping with loneliness

For me, loneliness was enough to make me quit my job and start No Isolation. I had no idea how big the issue really was, and I am still learning. If others are inspired to learn too, then perhaps we will find the answers we so desperately need.
There is much said about the reported social care 'crisis' in the UK. This has been caused by a myriad of factors, not least
"I am lonely. I have been lonely for months. Or is it years? I think it could be years. Sometimes, I go weeks without speaking
With every week that passes I grow increasingly upset with the world, so trying to change it for the better simply makes sense. The idea of somebody suffering in solitude, lacking meaningful connections in their life, is something I cannot abide. People need to be social
Loneliness has a severe impact on an older person's quality of life and leads to illnesses such as depression and a deterioration of cognitive ability. It is said that loneliness and isolation have a greater effect on mortality than other risk factors such as obesity, and are just as bad for your health as smoking.
I'm not lonely but I am alone. A fifty-something divorcé who has gotten used to her own company. This makes me as attractive as Lucrezia Borgia to men who ultimately don't want too much of a challenge in their romantic life.
A happy mother will find her happy medium and in doing so avoid becoming lonely. Everybody will have a different idea of what this is, but as long as they reach this goal, they are less at risk of becoming lonely.
Loneliness is literally painful. It activates the same brain areas that alert us to physical pain, making us seek out others and encouraging us to spend time with family and friends. To prevent our brains triggering this feeling, we must understand why it happens and learn to respond to it promptly.
As I languish in a town where I could count acquaintances of a similar age on one hand, working a zero-hour contract which my degree and successful school did little to prepare me for, the real world has somewhat lost its rosiness.
There will be a least one or two dark winter days, and nights, when I will be on my own. And I'm sure I will be lonely. I work from home, so if I'm having a detox (which I am currently) I can go days without human contact. So I can imagine what it's like for housebound pensioners.