coping with loss

One hundred years after the outbreak of the First World War, which contributed to a major shift in cultural attitudes and practices relating to death and mourning, with discussing dying increasingly becoming a taboo, many British people remain deeply uneasy talking about bereavement.
Last week I had 7 days of flat drama dealing with a broken boiler, leaking radiators, my windows very much proving their age and a my lounge ceiling collapsing wildly onto my wooden floor at 2am as a result of some dodgy plumbing in the flat above. Oh and the lovely sofa I had excitedly waited 8 weeks for finally arrived - and then had to be sent back as it wouldn't fit through the door!
You see, we all have assumptions about how our future will pan out. Because I work as a coach and help others create their future by setting a life goal I had also done this for myself. My goal was extremely compelling, I lived it and breathed it everyday and it was all for my wonderful wife. Take that motivation away and everything seems to fall apart.
I have been lucky enough in my life not to lose anyone that I was really close to. Apart from my grandparents, who passed away in old age, I can thankfully say that my immediate family and all of my good friends are still here with me. Death is the one thing that doesn't grow easier with age and I can only hope that I am strong enough to deal with the inevitable when it eventually happens.