corporate taxes

In the wake of the EU referendum the UK is revising its relationship with the world. We could use a few friends. Taking on a new role as the torchbearer for global tax reform could win us more than a few.
This week, the man who lifted the lid on the cynical practices employed by large, profitable corporations to avoid paying
Despite their claims to be leading the global fight against tax avoidance, British Conservatives have been vociferous in
If Justine Greening was to change the UK's position on a global tax body, it would not only increase the chances of a successful agreement at Addis, but also generate a huge amount of goodwill which she could use to ensure greater progress on the UK's other priorities, such as gender equality.
A measure designed to "kick British businesses up their lazy arses". That was the humorous remark made by an unnamed Cabinet member to The Times this week, following George Osborne's announcement that by 2020 corporation tax will be cut to 18%... if businesses pay their workers a new living wage of £9.00 an hour.
Starbucks reported its first ever fall in UK sales last year, during a period when it was hit by a customer boycott over
In recent years, America's technology giants have increased profits to epic levels. So you'd think this good fortune would prove a boon to the fragile American economy. A river of tax dollars from America's cash-rich technology firms ought to contribute towards a significant reduction of the US $17.5trillion debt mountain. Only it hasn't quite worked out that way...
I sincerely hope the B-Team lets the Millennial Generation lead them and that it doesn't turn into procession of corporate compunction by born again incumbent leaders. The world doesn't need apologies; it needs a new perspective that defines success. It needs a 'Boom'.
Osborne can give himself a pat on the back - the Autumn Statement was a tricky job, well done. Of course, that doesn't let the Chancellor entirely off the hook. There are still threats to his prospects of eventual success.
It's easy for politicians to look tough by asking questions, it's harder for them to stand up and take action. The challenge for campaigners now is how to turn this surge of interest in tax avoidance into people-powered pressure that forces a genuine, tangible result.