counterterrorism

In my view, this focus on Britishness facilitates lazy interpretations of values. Some lists suggest that children should be encouraged to listen to British music like Freddy Mercury or they should eat roast dinners at school! By all means, schools are welcome to display union flags and celebrate the Queen's birthday but this merely pays lip service to what British values are trying to achieve.
In recent weeks, the NSPCC reported a spike in the number of children requesting counselling sessions for race or faith-based
Baroness Sayeeda Warsi has said it's time to press the reset button and ensure that this time the Muslim community is an equal partner in the fight against terrorism, but the question I want to ask is whether the government is brave enough to have the grassroots community around the table and start right at the beginning by clearly defining the problem we are addressing, as only then will we find a solution because for me, enough is enough.
The arguments over how the attackers in London and Manchester were radicalised have veiled the fact that women and young people are tirelessly trying to speak up, and are often ignored. We are sick and tired of being held up as solely victims of gendered violence, when we also fight to stop it, by challenging outdated preachers and reviving new techniques of engaging with maligned people.
We are the ones who feel the full force of a racist backlash each time a terrorist attack happens. We are the ones who are made to feel guilty, on the defensive, anxious that our children will be picked on in the playground, or that our colleagues are whispering behind our backs. We are the ones who are abused, sworn at, spat at, pushed, punched, kicked, beaten and even killed on British streets. Our homes and places of worship are petrol-bombed and have faeces posted through their doors.
It appears since Prevent became a statutory duty on those working in the health sector since July 2015 the NHS referred 420 patients and staff to police in England and Wales in a year over concerns they were at risk of radicalisation, which equates to an average of 35 referrals a month.
Sudan's absolute impunity for ethnic cleansing, crimes against humanity and war crimes in the western region of Darfur has entered its thirteenth year. This year, the regime escalated its slaughter of civilians to the point of apparently gassing its own people.
Can prisons effectively challenge extremist perspectives, or do they incubate and encourage them to spread? How should we deal those who, like Choudary, are able to persuade and recruit individuals towards an extremist, and in some cases violent, mindset?
Ms Thewliss' efforts to focus attention on this issue are admirable. However, if the work of UN human rights bodies like the Committee is to be effective, then it is incumbent on both those who would use them - and those who report on them - to get the facts right.
Despite constant coverage of ISIS, known by their Arabic name as Daesh, Western media has overlooked the fact that a large proportion of their victims are ordinary Sunni Muslims - the very people they claims to represent. By doing this they are unwittingly aiding the narrative that Daesh is representing all Muslims against the West.