cpag

Measuring child poverty does not require additional spending or a change of direction in government policy. But if you don't measure it, you can't tackle it. We are simply asking government to show that all kids count. Surely the time has come for us all to agree on that?
The Autumn Statement provides a second bite of the cherry for a Chancellor to clear up the mistakes they made in their budget
Child poverty costs this country £29billion a year, and will rise to £35billion by 2020 if the projections prove accurate. Other countries are doing far better on the existing - internationally recognised - measures. It's not the child poverty targets that are 'discredited', but the government's approach to meeting them.
This week's Child Poverty Strategy will set the course for the next three years - taking us halfway to the target date. There is no silver bullet for ending child poverty, and the strategy needs to work on a number of fronts.
We have waited a long time for it, so it's good to see the Social Mobility and Child Poverty Commission publish its first progress report today. Mandated to assess how the government is doing in reducing child poverty and increasing social mobility, the report aims to provide a 'state of the nation' account of how the UK fairs.