craft beer

In my opinion, these are the ones that provide the most value or experience.
Having been in education for ten years, I've seen some real changes - all as dull as a Brexit talk at a vegan dinner party
Britain is a currently divided nation. If only there was something to unite us. There is - beer, the national drink, and the best place to drink it, the pub. In Britain we come together at the pub regardless of our background and status.
Ahhh, the first proper weekend of springtime. I could feel the sigh of relief from across the country yesterday when we not only got some blue sky but a warming sun as well. And on a Saturday too! Blossom on the trees, lawnmowers in the distance and everyone clock watching to see when they can open a beer. Yes ladies and gentlemen: the British winter is officially over.
Most of us have heard about Berlin's legendary nightlife. Walking through this soggy city I feel like its reputation precedes it somewhat, and I wonder if every dour building under the grey and overcast sky might contain some weird and whacky alcohol-fuelled dungeon. I'm sure there are plenty of other bloggers out there who will dive into that scene far more deeply than I have time for.
The Power Of Greyskull One For The Roadie? For more this type of nonsense make sure you check out Don't Believe The Hype
But now the wave is moving back in the other direction. You may find craft beer in every boozer, but it's likely to only be one of four brands and most of those are being swallowed up by the sort of conglomerations we rebelled against in the first place.
I'm willing to bet, that when you think of Virtual Reality you're not thinking about beer. Virtual Reality and beer in fact, seem like odd bedfellows; how does one drink a virtual pint you might ask.
Munching down fish and chips while enjoying a pint of Broadside is a must-do when visiting Southwold. Even if your face is more battered by the wind than your cod is by the fryer; and even if you're soggier from the rain than your chips are from the vinegar. In fact it all tends to add to the whole experience.
What happens, for example, if home-brewers manage to master the recipes, bottle them, and sell them for a profit? Could BrewDog be opening a floodgate of potential copyright or design infringements? Worse still: if supermarket own brands start tasting like BrewDog's Punk IPA, how could they prove, or stop it?