creative process

Teachers have a strong incentive to believe in nurture - that success is made as much as born. The strange exception is creativity, where education strategists fear to tread. As a new book identifies the seven creative behaviours behind success, we need to explore how creativity can be learnt.
There's been a lot of buzz around artists/creatives doing work for 'exposure' versus getting paid especially after Wil Wheaton
I laugh at my son when he says that he can't wait to be a grown up because then he can do what he wants. Darling, I say, if endless washing up and doing your taxes is doing what you want then sure, you'll love it.
Having worked with writers for many years and researched creative habits, we found there isn't one magic bullet to make you into a creative powerhouse. In fact there are seven - so here they are, seven ideas to tap into your inner muse and start creating on a regular basis.
As feverish NaNoWriMo writers across the globe step back from their overheated keyboards - some with 50,000 words in the bag and others with rather less - how do they keep writing come December when there's no deadline to hit?
Working environments have become more pressurised. With obtaining and retaining business now incredibly competitive, clients are becoming ever more demanding for their cash. However increased workloads in conjunction with reduced response times (further exacerbated since e-mail went mobile) means that employees are rarely given the necessary freedom to produce their best work. Overall, whilst the advertising industry naturally holds innovation and creativity as paramount importance, client pressures typically prevent such a culture from being entrenched into working life, and is instead an all too often an unfamiliar luxury. But what's being done and how can we all make room to be more creative?
We hear time and again how essential creative thinking is to business success. But it's often an elusive concept in the corporate environment - especially if you've trained in 'non-creative' skills like professional services.
A vivid imagination is not just a pre-requisite for creative professionals. From tackling work problems and getting the most
This week, I spoke to Swedish contemporary artist Ylva Kunze during her first London show, Artist in Residence. Her canvases, informed by the woods and lakes of her childhood in Småland, are deeply affecting, filled with kinetic fervour.
Welcome to Catching the Comet's Tail, a series of interviews with writers, artists and musicians discussing creativity and their creative process. To launch the series, I am delighted to welcome English author Elizabeth Fremantle.