crisis communications

There are plenty of reasons to be frustrated with the media. Depending on your political affiliations, whatever you watch
Mr Khosrowshahi has set a high bar for himself and his company's behaviour going forward. They may well be granted another chance in the UK but if they don't put their money where their mouth is then no amount of eloquence will help Uber reverse out of the ditch next time it drives into trouble.
Picture this: People are on the move; they haven't eaten for days, and some are dying. They need burial cloths. Burial cloths are more important to them than food, as it helps ensure a peaceful afterlife. In a poor village, the next life means hope if the dead are prepared. Hope is all they have.
SnapChat, iCloud, JP Morgan, Tesco, Target, Adobe. Over the past 12 months all of these have associated with cyber-attacks.
Talking often gets bad press. Some people do it way too much. However, most organisations and leaders don't do it enough, particularly when there is an issue in play. Whether you are a football referee, or Chief Executive of a care home from which a war hero has absconded, the rule is simple: When you have nothing to say, keep quiet. But when you do, make sure you say it or others will say something else that you may not like.
Today's news environment is different from that faced by the generation that wrote the original crisis comms rulebook; social media are becoming more dominant, driven by the increasing accessibility of cheap smartphones globally.
Warren Buffett isn't often wrong. Yet he was when he said: 'It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.' Most reputations are severely damaged because an organisation has failed over many years to operationally live up to the high expectations set by their PR and marketing activity.
Given these very public examples of how risky it can be to commit anything to email that you might not be willing to shout out in public it's odd then that people still go ahead and do it. And perhaps odder still that someone who is about to start legal training would do so.
In recent months we have seen two examples of household name businesses that faced a communications crisis when the social media accounts were taken over. Whilst there is a certain element of bad luck in these incidents, there are steps that businesses can take to protect themselves against this new kind of communications crisis.
The Lord Rennard affair is in many ways the perfect PR crisis, combining as it does what appear to be genuine operational problems with an undeniable failure to communicate these problems in a coherent or open manner.