crowdfunding

James Dance, 26, is looking to change his future during the recession and that of one of the many London pubs that are falling on hard times.
Crowdfunding is an amazing revolution in filmmaking and there's plenty of scope for filmmakers to work with their audience directly in bringing out films which the mainstream has no interest for.
If your own tastes run more to Henry James than E L James, you will find all this talk of tribes to be very far from your own understanding of the value of literature. If so, it's not all bad news.
Something in me finds them disconcerting. I admit I've not once contributed money to an artist's Pledge campaign. Each time I hear about one, even when I adore the artist, my heart sinks.
Kickstarter's very public successes have increased developer attraction to the platform. And with the increased developer activity, the number of failures and cancellations has increased also.
This was the heading of a recent Citi research report in the US, on the investment prospects of various regional banks. The title being an obvious play on the words from the infamous Dire Straits song 'Money for Nothing'. The broader subtext being that the banking system is broken.
While there are clearly many benefits to crowdsourcing as a means of pooling resources, knowledge, money and/or time as a way of achieving results, there are, of course, certain serious issues to be considered. The first is that those contributing to citizen projects have no proof of expertise and no individual viewpoint, which poses a problem for those seeking solutions or information of a quality that can be relied upon.