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I imagine driving somewhere in a van, France, Italy, the sense of freedom makes me happy, I stop off at a beauty parlour in some small town and get my nails painted pale pink, my hair extra blonded, I feel good. I by chance get invited out to dinner by some vague male apparition, I go out of curiosity, this is like tripping, I try to see what he looks like, Dennis Weaver in McCloud, crikey.
We're all familiar with portraits of Albert Einstein, Charles Darwin and Mark Twain, but with crumbling monochrome photos
Looking particularly radiant and morning-sickness free, the Duchess of Cambridge seemed to be showing the merest hint of
Although the bookbinder's craft isn't always about preservation, Rowledge has done a lot of book conservation work. But can the arts of the book protect the future of the environment?
Padding out of the snow, this Arctic fox blends almost completely into the blank landscape behind him. The image, snapped
British historians have probably enjoyed 2012. Two big set pieces, the Olympic Games and Diamond Jubilee, proved the ideal invitation to reflect on where we have come from, who we are now, and where we are going
A new book by Jon Ronson is always cause for cheer. The documentary filmmaker and author of The Psychopath Test and The Men Who Stare at Goats has a new collection of journalism - Lost at Sea: The Jon Ronson Mysteries.
In 2010, the philosopher Roger Scruton, together with the BBC, made a documentary titled Why Beauty Matters, in which he gave an eloquent and impassioned plea for a return to the beautiful aesthetic, pointing towards the unifying and spiritually uplifting qualities of beauty.
Instead of putting a kibosh on that rascal kid journalist and his adventures, let us look at how we can best use these images, and others, to illustrate and explain the complexity of colonialism, slavery and oppression in a wider context.
At first glance it appears to be a black and white photo torn in half. Then you noticed the nose facing the wrong way. Then