Curriculum

What do you remember being taught in your history lessons in secondary school? The Tudors, perhaps the Romans, the English Civil War and the two World Wars? For the seven years I studied history I am glad that we studied wars and monarchy but it seems a shame that I know little about the history of medicine, technology or engineering.
A student who took Michael Gove to task over axing climate change from the curriculum has emerged victorious after Gove announced
Micheal Gove has published a revised national curriculum, to be introduced to schools in England in September 2014. The publication
The ten things you need to know on Monday 8 July 2013... 1) ED VERSUS LEN Tomorrow, Ed Miliband will be giving a speech in
GCSEs could be replaced by a system of new I levels - with numbered grades from 1 to 8 - under sweeping changes to school
The Jamaican Mary Seacole became an heroine when she travelled over 4,000 miles to nurse and attend sick British soldiers in the Crimea during the Crimean War. During her life her exploits were revered, by royalty, the military elite and thousands of ordinary citizens. More than 100 years later, tens of thousands of school children view Seacole as a wonderful role model.
The curriculum should be encouraging creativity in its students, offering them choice over how to approach problems and giving them as much autonomy as possible in their approach.
According to the report, it was noticeable that students were making 3D and colour notes in their storyboards when creating levels for the game - these were in audio, colour and moving forms. Dr Passey believes this form of technology could be used in the future to create notes and presentations that would serve some students better.
We live in a country where 30% of children leave school obese or overweight and where we spend £6billion on treating diet related diseases every year. We have a generational skills gap - 60% of 18 to 25 year olds leave home without being able to cook five basic dishes. And it is making us unhealthy and unhappy.
Gove inexcusably glosses over some of the worst horrors of British colonial history; yet his first stated aim is to show "how Britain influenced the world". Mau Mau and British-run forced labour camps in South Africa, for example, seem forgotten.
Whether girl or woman, boy or man, you need to 'belong'. You need to feel important to others and connected with them. What you don't need is to be controlled or used by anyone else. Support is very different from social suffocation; sharing is very different from being taken for a dangerous ride.
As a boy in a boarding school myself many years ago, which was single sex until A levels, the arrival of girls in the sixth form was the worst possible distraction to teenage boys about to embark serious exams. Boys and girls perhaps learn differently and approach work in different ways.
Like it or not, life is a competitive process and we are all subjected to competition on a daily basis. Exams, job interviews and even in vying for the hand of a prospective partner, there is always (well, in most cases) someone else out there trying their best to take the glory for themselves.
Michael Gove, a scholarship pupil at the selective Robert Gordon's College in Aberdeen, clearly regards his own educational experience as a template for the rest of us. It worked for me, the thinking goes, so it ought to work for everyone else too.
In order to have an overview of what happens beyond the classroom, I have recently appointed an Assistant Head for the Enrichment Programme in my school, as I believe that this is part and parcel of a good British education.
Perhaps, as the bicentennial year draws to a close and we move into Dickens' third century, there is something else the Victorian author can teach us - and that is not to teach him to our children.
Calculators are to be banned from maths tests for 11-year-olds, the Government has announced. The move comes amid concerns
The Common Entrance exam is used as an admissions process for academically selective independent secondary schools. Children attend preparatory school to ready themselves for the exams and sit them aged 13.
Mastering several languages makes it possible to get rid of the tyranny of monolingualism in the sense that it does away with the very narrow view of the world whereby language and reality have an unchangeable equivalence.
Coding and children is a topic that seems to be gaining momentum lately. We teach our kids how an electric kettle works, what the inside of a plug looks like and how to set up an electrical circuit to light a bulb - why not teach them how computers work?