Curriculum

Whether girl or woman, boy or man, you need to 'belong'. You need to feel important to others and connected with them. What you don't need is to be controlled or used by anyone else. Support is very different from social suffocation; sharing is very different from being taken for a dangerous ride.
As a boy in a boarding school myself many years ago, which was single sex until A levels, the arrival of girls in the sixth form was the worst possible distraction to teenage boys about to embark serious exams. Boys and girls perhaps learn differently and approach work in different ways.
Like it or not, life is a competitive process and we are all subjected to competition on a daily basis. Exams, job interviews and even in vying for the hand of a prospective partner, there is always (well, in most cases) someone else out there trying their best to take the glory for themselves.
Michael Gove, a scholarship pupil at the selective Robert Gordon's College in Aberdeen, clearly regards his own educational experience as a template for the rest of us. It worked for me, the thinking goes, so it ought to work for everyone else too.
In order to have an overview of what happens beyond the classroom, I have recently appointed an Assistant Head for the Enrichment Programme in my school, as I believe that this is part and parcel of a good British education.
Perhaps, as the bicentennial year draws to a close and we move into Dickens' third century, there is something else the Victorian author can teach us - and that is not to teach him to our children.
Calculators are to be banned from maths tests for 11-year-olds, the Government has announced. The move comes amid concerns
The Common Entrance exam is used as an admissions process for academically selective independent secondary schools. Children attend preparatory school to ready themselves for the exams and sit them aged 13.
Mastering several languages makes it possible to get rid of the tyranny of monolingualism in the sense that it does away with the very narrow view of the world whereby language and reality have an unchangeable equivalence.
Coding and children is a topic that seems to be gaining momentum lately. We teach our kids how an electric kettle works, what the inside of a plug looks like and how to set up an electrical circuit to light a bulb - why not teach them how computers work?