Customer Experience

AI can efficiently search for knock-offs, quickly flagging any potential breaches of copyright and preventing the growth of a black market. It might not seem like that much of a big deal - more stuff on the cheap, eh? - but if measures aren't put in place, the market becomes saturated.
Modern consumers are different beasts to their/our parents' generation. The way bills are paid, taxis booked, newspapers read and even birthday cards sent has changed and barring the occasional retro experience, we are not looking back.
Technology is pervasive in modern life. You can barely turn around without seeing a new gadget being launched. Yet, despite the fact we've been used to technology in environments such as entertainment and retail for years, hospitality has seemingly dragged behind.
In my life, I have not once shouted at a complete stranger in public. If someone was shouting in a shop or restaurant I would
Supporting the capture and promotion of ideas is an important step, but it's only a first step. The time and effort required to turn these ideas into concrete results often requires funding. What's more, in my experience, allocating resources to innovation also sends a strong message to employees that innovation matters.
However, scientists are a long way from building machines that have human-like, multi-purpose intelligence, and instead, the most common form of AI that we encounter today is predictive intelligence.
I don't think that it's any different when we interact with brands. You just have to look on Twitter to see the streams of frustration from unhappy customers, and on the flip side, tweets from brands that make customers feel their concerns were listened to.
E-commerce has forever altered customer expectations, but now it's bricks and mortars changing the way we engage with brands. From engineered serendipity to personalised environments, new technologies are giving retailers the opportunity to deliver exciting, unique, and sharable experiences you can't get online or in an app.
United Airlines is making headlines after forcibly removing a passenger from an overbooked flight. The behavior was absolutely avoidable, but here's the thing--United started out by trying to look out for employees' and customers' best interests.
It's time for the creative disruption of legacy systems to align with the next phase of computing: adding intelligence into customer and employee-facing applications, like Salesforce, to enable companies to unlock and monetize data.