cyber attacks

I have spent the last decade talking about problems. I suppose the reason is because it seems to have gotten me a lot of attention. It wasn't like that at first, but it eventually turned out that way.
These proposals are a necessary step in the increasing battle we face in keeping safe online. It is inevitable that we are going to need measures in place to ensure wellbeing online is protected, especially of children.
You get home after a great night out. You're thinking you'll be a bit tired for tomorrow morning's meeting but it was worth it to see your friends. You're just about to put your keys into the lock, when the door opens. The lock's broken. You move from mellow to misery, via terror, in about half a second. You've been burgled, done over, invaded. Your deadlock's deadbeat.
You can buy pretty much anything on the internet. You just need to know where to look. For most of us, the only times we'd venture off the beaten track would be to find a specialist birthday gift perhaps, or a niche item you spotted on Pinterest, Facebook or Reddit. But what might surprise you is that in some places, your digital belongings could also be listed for sale - all at rock bottom prices.
To be in with a chance to 'own the home' providers must ensure that quality underpins not only the devices themselves - from conception right through to when the product enters our home - but also customer interactions, our personal data and ultimately our safety. Let the race begin.
Overall the rationale for maintaining a direct engagement capability seems overwhelming, whether states admit to it or not. We will doubtless see many more states build up significant capability and there remains the possibility of various pseudo-states doing so. Interesting times lie ahead.
These worrying statistics highlight just how vulnerable the business community remains to data breaches, even after an unprecedented period of public disclosures. Britain's businesses cannot continue to treat cyber security as a box-ticking exercise and risk falling foul of harmful attacks.
In today's connected world securing your own network is simply not enough. Today your digital risk extends not only to your own servers, PCs and other devices in your offices and other locations; it also extends to your mobile workers and other staff working from home, customer sites and other remote locations. But the third, and often ignored, area of digital risk is your supply chain; companies that have access to your employee and customer information.
Cyber security competitions give pupils the opportunity to implement the skills and theory they have been taught at university in a realistic environment, while learning new ones in the process, which will help grow them in to the cyber defenders of the future.
Malicious actors have a range of motivations, including geopolitical, ideological and espionage purposes. However, it is the financially-motivated cybercriminals we commonly see targeting the organizations we work with. These actors will go wherever the money is. Pure and simple.