cyber crime

New data has revealed that where you live in the UK affects how likely you are to be scammed, and the nature of the fraud
There are also wider lessons for any other business or organisation - given the dependency of all institutions on IT systems, the large numbers of users and devices that connect to those systems and the increasing requirement for 'always on' capability. This blog post will address five key observations that are aimed at stimulating planning and thinking.
The UK General Election is now only a week away, and it arrives against the backdrop of media hype and coverage surrounding possible attempts by hackers to influence national elections (see: US, French elections).
The digital age has brought huge benefits to Britain, but new and different challenges too. Our ability as individuals to use digital technology - find and share information, do our shopping, pay our bills and communicate with one another - has grown more quickly than our knowledge of how to do all those things safely.
The low level of security awareness took itself into the enterprise, and businesses are faced with the task of educating the workforces on an ongoing basis.
This is not said by way of criticism, but rather to acknowledge the challenge inherent within security innovation. Companies and governments can't afford to expose their digital security set-up, but must somehow find a way to embrace new innovations or the hackers will, inevitably, find a way through.
One woman praised her “amazing” doctor for sorting out her daughter’s prescription with pen and paper. NHS staff have been
These worrying statistics highlight just how vulnerable the business community remains to data breaches, even after an unprecedented period of public disclosures. Britain's businesses cannot continue to treat cyber security as a box-ticking exercise and risk falling foul of harmful attacks.
In today's connected world securing your own network is simply not enough. Today your digital risk extends not only to your own servers, PCs and other devices in your offices and other locations; it also extends to your mobile workers and other staff working from home, customer sites and other remote locations. But the third, and often ignored, area of digital risk is your supply chain; companies that have access to your employee and customer information.