cyberattacks

You get home after a great night out. You're thinking you'll be a bit tired for tomorrow morning's meeting but it was worth it to see your friends. You're just about to put your keys into the lock, when the door opens. The lock's broken. You move from mellow to misery, via terror, in about half a second. You've been burgled, done over, invaded. Your deadlock's deadbeat.
To be in with a chance to 'own the home' providers must ensure that quality underpins not only the devices themselves - from conception right through to when the product enters our home - but also customer interactions, our personal data and ultimately our safety. Let the race begin.
In today's connected world securing your own network is simply not enough. Today your digital risk extends not only to your own servers, PCs and other devices in your offices and other locations; it also extends to your mobile workers and other staff working from home, customer sites and other remote locations. But the third, and often ignored, area of digital risk is your supply chain; companies that have access to your employee and customer information.
Malicious actors have a range of motivations, including geopolitical, ideological and espionage purposes. However, it is the financially-motivated cybercriminals we commonly see targeting the organizations we work with. These actors will go wherever the money is. Pure and simple.
We live in a world dominated by smartphones and tablets, and by the applications that run on these mobile devices. These applications help us with everything, including expenses, mobile banking, the weather and access to your corporate and personal email
We need more people to realize cybersecurity is an interesting and exciting career so we can have the skills and expertise for the future that we need to protect people, governments and organisations from the menace of professional cybercriminality.
Many people were this week startled by reports that GCHQ technical director Dr Ian Levy had apparently claimed that security
If I had been writing this blog even three years ago, it is probable I would have talked about needing to recognise the cyber risk and not bury our heads in the sand to the industrialised threat caused by professional cybercrime.
In many ways, 2016 was very much the 'Year of the Ransomware Threat', and it is very hard to see that changing much next year. After all most cybercrime is driven by hard cash and the fact remains that most ransomware and extortion attacks are successful.
The truth is that exposed credentials from adult dating sites hold particular value for cyber criminals given their potential to extort victims. Most subscribers to these services want to remain anonymous and don't want their employers or families to know. Users are likely to be prepared to pay large amounts of money to prevent their details being exposed online where others can see them.