cybercriminals

We've all been there. Either sheepishly asking our kids, 'how do you do that thing that makes it stop beeping', or on the other side sighing as you pick up your father's phone and see 36 notifications in the task bar. But those days could be numbered.
Robots already exist; indeed, they are playing an increasing role in society. It's likely that in 30 years there will be billions upon billions of robots, particularly for manual labour, but also for use in environments in which it would be dangerous for humans to operate safely.
Free public WiFi is one of the hallmarks of our times. So addicted are we to staying connected, we can barely bear to be offline nowadays - mobile professionals, students and the growing army of freelance creatives are drawn to free WiFi, served by cafes and bars, like bees to a honeypot.
The cybercriminals behind Darkhotel have been operating for almost a decade, targeting thousands of victims across the globe. 90 per cent of the infections we have seen are in Japan, Taiwan, China, Russia and Hong Kong, but we have also seen infections in Germany, the USA, Indonesia, India, and Ireland.
A certain major sporting event gets underway this month with the eyes of the world glued to their televisions, smartphones, tablets and laptops looking for the latest news coming out of Brazil and the fate of their national sides and favourite players.
Tor (short for The Onion Router) is software designed to allow someone to remain anonymous when accessing the Internet. It has been around for some time, but for many years was used mainly by experts and enthusiasts. However, Edward Snowden's revelations have resulted in a surge of interest in Tor as more people seek online anonymity.
No one likes to have to have a difficult conversation with a friend, family member or colleague. In the context of the home, there is nothing worse than having to tell your son or daughter their cherished hamster has died for example.
315,000 new samples are analysed every day. Browser-based attacks nearly doubled to 1,700,870,654.Offline attacks (via USB flash-drive, for example) totalled 3 billion, from a total of 1.8 million malicious and potentially unwanted programs.
'Ransomware' Trojans, as the name suggests, are designed to directly extort money from their victims. They may block access to a computer's file system, or encrypt data that's stored on it and then ask for a payment to release the data.
Cybercrime today is not like the early days of virus writers and hackers who bragged about their exploits with friends. Today cybercrime is a serious business where actually most hackers do not want to be noticed as the longer they remain hidden in the network and are free to conduct their operations, the more information they can steal and the more money they can make.