Data Breaches

Forward-thinking organisations are already starting to completely rethink their security approaches to keep up with evolving cyber threats. What can we expect in the future? Here are the top five global cyber security trends that will define how businesses fight back in 2018:
If 'data-is-the-new-oil' is obsolete as an analogy, Big Data companies have a choice to make. If they don't change their business models to a more human-friendly and sustainable data-is-water model, will they face becoming obsolete?
The list of things that will change when Brexit comes into effect is almost immeasurable. What will remain the same, however, is the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) ruling on data regulations in the UK. Despite Brexit, GDPR will still have a seismic impact on businesses who use and store EU data.
Data is supposed to be the new oil, powering all industries and underpinning major business decisions. That said, ask any Tom, Dick or Harry on the street what the word data means to them and they are likely to draw a blank.
By having a Crisis Management Plan in place, organisations are better prepared to identify potential attack scenarios, enabling you to better handle a security incident irrespective of type and scale.
If I had been writing this blog even three years ago, it is probable I would have talked about needing to recognise the cyber risk and not bury our heads in the sand to the industrialised threat caused by professional cybercrime.
Developing and implementing a security incident response plan can be time consuming and often costly - two things most organisations do not have. Without a response plan, incidents can escalate quickly and the impact can be severe. An incident response plan gives organisations a much better chance of isolating and controlling an incident in a timely and cost effective manner.
Organisations plan for success. They should also plan for worst case scenarios - especially in the case of a cyber attack or breach. For many organisations, preparedness means developing plans for disaster recovery and continuity of operations.
These are insider threats, the number one contributing factor to security incidents within enterprises. Despite what you see in hacker movies such as Blackhat, the biggest threat to organisations' networks are the people who are working for them.
Honest insiders also are targeted by malicious outsiders through using social engineering. E-mail phishing (and spear-phishing to target high-value individuals) is one of the most common types of social engineering, but examples range from simple phone calls to carefully crafted Web sites hosting malicious content.