David Ogilvy

If you are lucky you will get plenty of advice as you forge ahead with your career...and of course there is always the internet to turn to now for comment and thought. But as I think about some of the things people have taught me over the years I often wish that I had learned them earlier - I wish someone had sat me down and just shared a few key pointers right at the beginning.
Next year, after the General Election, how many of the new Cabinet will be qualified to become ministers of government? What, for example, if a deal has to be done with Ukip? Will these appointments be made on merit or political expediency? Or will these people have been grown, nurtured, into their jobs? I think we know the answer.
'You can't bore people into buying your product, you can only interest them into buying it.' ... In today's world, is advertising interesting? ... Are all interestings equal? Or are some more interesting than others? How interesting does an interesting have to be to get noticed?
"Writing advertising copy, which I learned largely from the great David Ogilvy, taught me not to waffle, and to use facts instead of purple prose when describing something," says Peter Mayle over a glass of red.
"The consumer isn't a moron; she is your wife." So said David Ogilvy, the man who founded the company I work for. It's a memorable quote, in no small part for the way it reveals attitudes of his time (it appears in his book, Confessions of An Advertising Man, first published in 1963.)
The Rt Hon Theresa May, Secretary of State for the Home Office has announced that she wishes to create a 'hostile environment
In this sense, within the space of my career, marketing has gone from nothing to everything. That's some journey.
Late last year, I read the obituary of former Cabinet Minister, Sir Timothy Raison. He served under Edward Heath and Margaret