David Willetts

A Government prediction that around 45% of student loans will never be paid back has raised concerns about the benefits of
Growing concerns that migrants see the UK as "closed for business" could be confirmed by official migration figures set to
The Student Loans Company has always been an enigmatic public burden - a costly but necessary evil that allows Britain to foster young talent and train the leaders of tomorrow. In turn, these government-funded loans go on to perpetuate a forward-thinking attitude that willingly takes on the risk of investing in people rather than a plethora of tangible, short-term cash cows. Well, apparently the government has decided investing in people is no longer worth the risk...
After student protests across the country, on Monday the Government will sell off £900 million of student loans to a private
What could be more outrageous than the undemocratic trebling of tuition fees, or the fundamentally anti-working class policy of scrapping EMA, denying thousands of poorer students their chance at further and higher education? After the attacks on FEs, raising fees for adult learners and axing half a million places, where could the coalition sink to next?
In June this year, Danny Alexander, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, confirmed that the government would be privatising the student loan book as part of a greater flogging of state assets in order to raise £15 billion.
The five things you need to know on Monday 4 November 2013... 1) SIXTY TWO BILLION REASONS TO STAY IN THE EU Is the pro-EU
James Dyson has lambasted Britain’s undervaluing of engineers and scientists, citing the UK's looming energy crisis as a
The government this week signed an agreement which means our looming energy crisis will be solved by nuclear power stations built by the French and owned, in part, by the Chinese. This demonstrates the impact of Britain's skills shortage and our lack of ambition. To top it all, they have warned us that the dearth of hi-tech engineering skills in our economy may hold them back. The skills shortage is not a problem confined to the crucially important energy sector, it's systemic. We need more engineers and scientists.
Universities should spend more time teaching students rather than focusing on research, universities minister David Willetts