death & dying

I cannot help but turn to the cliché that the only certainty in life is death. Everywhere, every day, people encounter the dying and have to deal with death. My father's death last month gave me a genuine understanding of the phrase 'a peaceful death'.
I wrote in December about doing Christmas brilliantly. I hope everyone did and had a great time. Part of that ramble was saying that Christmas is an opportunity to end the year well and start a new one well. Ending something well has become a bit of a theme over the last few weeks for a number of reasons.
When my dad first asked us to bring him a Brompton cocktail after two months in the same bed at the specialist respiratory
After the funeral I said good-bye to George and thanked him for sharing his memories with me. He shook my hand tightly. His eyes were filled with tears.
As a hospice music therapist I've met many people whose lives were well lived. But unfortunately, not everyone lives a fulfilled life. Even so, every dying person has something to teach the living.
Whether it's through writing a will, making financial plans, planning for our future care and support including through making a Lasting Power of Attorney, or deciding whether we want to join the organ donor, all of us can increase the likelihood of getting our wishes met and reduce the chances of life after our death becoming even more difficult for the people we care about.
The distinction in Hugo's care between 'there being no hope' and 'no further treatment' being worthwhile with 'nothing more can be done' is crucial. Nothing more could be done to save Hugo's life, but we were able to give him a good death.
Is it depressing to work at hospice? As a music therapist specializing in hospice I've been asked this question many times
It was seven years ago that I lost my first husband in a tragic plane crash. At the time I was a second grade teacher and just the other day I came across the letters that my students wrote after his death.
Recently I have felt the same way when I see a mature tree being felled. I need to turn away in case I catch a  grimace in its great barked face, sometimes I even think I hear a cry under the buzz of the saw.