death & dying

When our friend Stevie rang us up to say he was ill and couldn't come down for the weekend we didn't think much of it. He'd been taken into hospital but was laughing about it with his usual dry wit. He'd rang us on Thursday. On Sunday he was dead. He was 24.
In April 2012, I started a new project that asked a not-so-easily-answered question related to both the past and future: What can 21st century cemeteries become?
The theory is that someone who is more OK about death would be better at looking after a dying person than someone that who is very scared. This makes sense, but the interesting thing is the amount of evidence for this.
Specialist care of the dying may be put at risk in the future because of a recruitment crisis, a health charity has warned
The classic Five Stages of Loss, also known as the Five Stages of Dying, are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Boredom, and Acceptance. Wait, that's six. Where does Boredom come into the picture? Answer: after about thirty minutes, if the picture in question is 50/50, the new 'Cancer Comedy.'
Saying goodbye to a parent is the most difficult experience I have ever gone through. You never really know how hard it will be until it happens.
"Can you go straight out to an accident" said the skipper as I walked in the door at twenty-to-five clutching my lunch and a box of reduced price Asda cookies to share with the shift. I had, for once, had time to grab a treat (on the way to work) for us to munch on during parade but wasn't going to be able to join them to eat it.