death of newspapers

When I was asked by Paul Dacre to become editor of Metro back in 2000, he told me with a mischievous glint in his eye: 'Make it good...but don't make it too good'.
In the last few days there have been a profusion of articles and blog posts designed to give a General Patton style slap
'I am a conduit for the truth' - Katie Hopkins In a particularly bizarre Season 18 Episode of South Park, Lorde (who we find
Peter Oborne quits the Telegraph. He accuses them of bad things. He says they pander to advertisers, drop stories and run populist headlines. Everyone who cares says 'wow!' and the Telegraph gets a kicking on Twitter. That's the upshot of the story. But even if the Telegraph did do all these things, why was Oborne so surprised and shocked?
As journalists are finding, fewer and fewer people interested anymore in real journalism. Nowadays, it's damn near impossible to get hits on a print article from the millennial generation unless you call it something along the lines of "12 Schools in the Gaza Strip that Needed a Makeover Anyway."
I'm undecided on the future of print journalism but I'm sure of one thing: ever increasing digitalisation, which has spawned the blog and twitter, has brought about the democratisation of reporting, journalism, writing and commentary.
The Western Mail has struck a chord with its rugby world cup audience by producing a front page which has set Twitter alight
As the global news media shifts from pulp to digital, cries of "Stop the press!" seem destined to fade into golden, halcyon