Decriminalization

"Now we can start to have the conversation about using them mindfully."
Twenty-seventeen is poised to be a challenging year for drug policy reform. Extrajudicial killings have surpassed 7,000 in
If you really care about these vulnerable women, men and children, then instead of spoiling for the fight that the media have predictably turned into the main story, acknowledge that you are unified in your beliefs that the current law doesn't work, that criminalising victims doesn't help and that you want to do something about it?
Amnesty and the many other organisations that advocate for the decriminalisation of sex work are not saying that prostitution is a human right, or endorsing sex trafficking. Rather, they are asking for an end to the violence, state brutality, and stigma that sex workers face on a routine basis.
Real drug policy changes are possible. As we've seen this year, they often happen at the national level, and UNGASS will be an important moment to think about our collective approach to drugs and drug use, to challenge the prohibitionist regimes that undermine human rights, social justice, and public health. Reform-minded nations like the ones highlighted above can be leaders in that process.
Saving lives of his people dying of AIDS is Kofi Annan's legacy. Ban Ki Moon's legacy could be ushering us into a new era of drug policy. The world is ready.
Last week I hosted an open debate about substance misuse. It proved so popular we spent the evening adding chairs at the
Most people are voiceless because no one is letting them talk or listening to them when they do. There is a lot to be said for quitting being the voice of the voiceless and letting people speak for themselves. But not by those seeking to abolish the sex trade. Words are put into people's mouths when they can be, and when they can't, those people are silenced and dismissed.
A police chief in favour of decriminalising class A drugs has repeated his call for an "honest debate" to help take the money
As a society we need a serious paradigm shift regarding how much we allow the government to interfere with our free choices as citizens. The vast majority of people using illegal drugs in the UK are not addicts, but are perfectly functional members of society who enjoy drugs recreationally...
Ending the criminalisation of drug use would remove the need to unnecessarily search hundreds of thousands of people every year. Thus ensuring that the numbers of people, especially those from the black community, caught up in the criminal justice system is significantly reduced.
I have long been bothered by an inexcusable absence among the many recovery options available to people struggling with addictions: marijuana is not considered a viable substitute.
Cannabis and ecstasy should be sold in licensed shops, with the possession and use of all illegal drugs should be decriminalised
Tory MP Louise Mensch has said she did class A drugs in her youth and that it had "long term mental health" effects on her
The UK is "plainly losing" the war on drugs - and may even be going backwards, justice secretary Kenneth Clarke said today
The Guardian/Mixmag drugs survey, published this week, highlighted the fact that there are many people out there using drugs without significant health harms. Among them are 'legal highs' or, more accurately, 'new psychoactive substances'.
Whatever excuses the Commonwealth may offer in its defence, one fact is indisputable: in the six decades of its existence it has never debated LGBT human rights.