Delft University

The quality of European universities and their campuses not only affects policy agendas of education, research and innovation. It also affects Europe's position in the global competition for the best students and professors (the global 'battle for brains'), and the wider competitive advantage, productivity, profitability and sustainable development of Europe.
Globalisation has rendered us increasingly inter-dependent with massive opportunities and also risks/challenges as a result. Driven by technological advances from transport, to communications, and electronic networks, globalisation has delivered important advancements in terms of movement and exchange of people, ideas, values, resources, commodities and finance.
The return on investment will be high for Europe if we get it right, including: a reinvigorated research and education infrastructure, attraction of the best students and faculty, a better skilled workforce, and enhanced competitive advantage vis a vis the rest of the world.
Earlier this week, the Netherlands hosted the third Nuclear Security Summit (NSS). More than 50 world leaders where in The Hague to enhance international nuclear security...
Increasing evidence and scientific analysis is showing why these events are associated with human induced climate change. The related impacts are becoming more widespread and complex, affecting society from health issues to agriculture, from transportation to economics, and becoming more severe, long-lasting and costly with increasing frequency.
The reason why Europe has fallen behind, quite simply, is money. Whilst funding of many European universities is being eroded all the time, countries like China are investing amounts unimaginable to us in facilities. Their scientific quality generally stills falls short of ours, but their facilities are well ahead.