dementia care

This Dementia Awareness Week we have seen incredible first-person accounts of how creativity and technology can make living with dementia more manageable. Although we don't have a cure for the disease, there are still innumerable ways to bring as much joy as possible to the lives of those living with dementia.
According to The Alzheimer's Society, there are currently 850,000 people in the UK with some form of dementia. It's estimated
Slowly, painfully slowly, the good days were fewer and fewer, and our visits mainly consisted of us trying to make conversation with someone who barely knew we were there. My grandma would dutifully feed him biscuits when we visited. A woman in the corner of the day room, with white hair that stood on end, screamed periodically like a crowing rooster. The nurses seemed kind.
Time. It's the most important part of my role as a caregiver for older people. I couldn't love my job as much as I do without
Political turmoil has largely characterised the social care scene in 2016, resulting in a continuously changing political
Wherever you source your news, you're never far from a story about dementia. Recently we heard how dementia is set to become a trillion dollar disease by 2018, then news that exercise could prevent early onset of the condition was in the headlines again.
With awards season is in full swing, it was great to see dementia being brought to the forefront of conversation as Julianne Moore was awarded an Oscar for her role in Still Alice. One person in particular who was touched by the film was Lesley Loizou who works at Anchor's West Hall, a care home that offers specialist dementia care.
A Scottish student has been left in shock after being rejected from an English college - because they said Scotland wasn't
This Christmas thousands of people across the country will be alone; they won't be alone in the conventional sense of not having a place stay, or people to look out for them: they will face exclusion because of an illness that can change the very person they used to be.
Ever walk into a room and forget why you went in there? You are not alone. Research from Bupa has identified that two thirds of adults (63%) admit to suffering embarrassing or annoying 'memory blots' three or more times a week.