demographics

Rather we need deliberative and engaging policies designed to increase political trust and civic engagement amongst millennials whilst thinking about the long-term common good. In short, this is the beginning not the end of the process.
In 2015, a massive 58% of live births in London were to mothers who themselves were born outside the UK. For contrast, this compares to 11% of births in the North East region of England (the lowest proportion) and 27% for England and Wales as a whole.
The reality, however, is that well-managed migration can benefit national economies. Despite the popular belief that a new wave of immigrants will increase unemployment, the National Institute of Economics and Social Research says there is no aggregate impact of migration on unemployment. Similar misconceptions abound about the strain on public services.
The decision to Brexit is one of the most irrational collective decisions in recent history, because those already feeling the heat have turned it up even higher, proving to be their own worst enemy. It was a destructive move, but it wasn't a bolt out of the blue either.
"We're all living longer". You'll have heard the phrase trotted out to explain everything from the rise in the state pension age to the challenges facing the NHS.
There are four primary reasons for multiple births. "It runs in the family" (inherited on the mother's side) and a higher propensity within some ethnic groups; Nigeria has the highest multiple births rates in the world, for example, with Japan among the lowest. However, neither of these are increasing the overall number of multiple births.
The world is ageing rapidly. As fertility falls and life expectancy grows, the num-ber of older people in both the developed and developing world is soaring. By 2050, there will be more than 2 billion people aged over 60 on this planet, out-numbering children below the age of 15 and accounting for 21.5% of the global population.
Numbers and statistics can be used to produce interesting maps and charts but, much more importantly, they can help us understand current and future policy problems. That's the real message here.
But what about the hundreds of millions of older people in countries without this social security architecture, and where little or no such services exist? By 2050, 80% of the world's population over 60 will be living in developing countries. What sort of older age can they look forward to?
Speaking as a midwife and one of the 1.1 billion people living in Africa, to my mind, there is one recurring topic that perfectly fits this year's theme: "Reshaping of the World"- and that is the future of our people.