Demography

London is not the racial melting pot many assume
White Britons are the least likely of all ethnic groups to socialise with other races, a new survey has revealed. The study
11 July is UN world population day. An easy way to remember the date is that in June this year the UN demographers upped their estimate of future global population to peak at around 11billion in about a century's time. By the dawn of the 22nd Century there will be 50% more of us, they think, give or take a few billion either way. The default reaction has been to predict doom.
The exit polling data is clear. Apart from political party, no other measure explains the outcome of the election more than race and ethnicity. Not gender, not religion, not age.
The we-of-the-future will look back uncomprehendingly on the self-serving we-of-the-present and ask despairingly how it came to pass that our leaders were not challenged mightily by us, the electorate, about their failure to address the most pressing issues of our time.
11 July, according to the UN, is World Population Day. The aim is to ensure universal access for the world's women to reproductive health services, including, in the fine print, voluntary family planning. In truth, the latter offers what is arguably the most cost-effective means of reducing human misery in the long term.
The victory of the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi in Egypt's presidential elections, and the strong showing of fundamentalist Salafis in legislative elections, completes a wave of Islamist electoral success that began in Tunisia and has swept the Arab world. One day soon, Islamist regimes may hold sway in an unbroken arc from Morocco to Turkey.