demonstrations

As I write this, thousands are gathering in Paris to urge world leaders to make a binding commitment to tackle climate change. I have to admit - I feel guilty for not being amongst them, for not doing my bit to swell the ranks and help in raising awareness of a cause that has such global significance.
Cameron's new campaign contains no concrete plans for curtailing the above, no plans for injecting life into the economies of these communities once IS has been eradicated and no plans for bringing an end to a civil war which has displaced 9.5 million people. Thus, as seen in Ma'an, a cycle of fight or flight will continue in the absence of any genuine offering of enduring stability for the Syrian people.
The Nepalese community in England united last week in protest of the unofficial, yet ongoing, blockade between Nepal and India. The demonstration coincided with a visit from Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to the UK.
Protest is increasingly going digital. Whether it is using the internet to organise and report physical acts of protest, using online space as a platform on which to take action, or targeting online infrastructure itself: across the world, people are taking their right to protest online.
People are angry with President Humala, who they say is in the pocket of Southern Copper: 'Our politicians are corrupt. The president refuses to listen to the protestors because he and others take bribes from the mine'. Another passer-by blames the government: 'My two boys are policemen. The government should make Southern Copper leave. Instead, Humala makes us kill each other.'
The National Union of Students has been accused of "actively encouraging" students’ unions to pull out of the upcoming Free
There is a running joke in our house that my son is destined to be an accountant: Not because of his freakish ability to do mental arithmetic but because he rejects every attempt to fill his life with awesome in favour of being painfully sensible.
If we are to successfully push back the current wave of racism, we will need an unrelenting campaign in the student movement in defence of our multicultural society against those who wish to divide us.
It was 6am when the lights came on and Rage Against the Machine started playing through the speakers in the University of Sheffield's Richard Roberts lecture hall. About 50 students from across Sheffield, including activists from the Autonomous Students Network, the Living Wage Campaign, the Revolutionary Socialists Society and others occupied the building at 7pm on Wednesday October 30, the night before the planned staff strikes...
What came out over the four week trial at Woolwich Crown Court gives rise to serious questions over whether kettling thousands of protesters in a confined space without warning or explanation does more harm than good - inflaming tensions, provoking conflict and increasing the number of injuries and damage that it's supposed to prevent.