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Over the summer there are have been many media articles and political interventions raising questions about the growth and
There is still time for the Government to reconsider the professional and financial ramifications, and even more importantly, the ramifications for the children and young people we care for, who need, and have always needed the secure emotional base provided by safe, stable, careful, committed and reflective professional care.
It is not okay to normalise that school work will make you cry and interfere with your family life, social life and love life. Nor to sanitise the well-documented crisis we have with workload related-mental health issues by saying that every teacher is under that pressure.
What's needed is to grow the size of the sector, by design increasing the number of homes for some needs, so that members of each sub-group meeting specifically identified needs can contribute asking the same questions, wrestling with the same issues, and worrying about the same things as you are, so that they feel a little less isolated and a little more recognised.
62p doesn't quite buy you a first class stamp but this modest sum has averted the collapse of a hotly-anticipated Department for Education pilot scheme.
Sir Martin Narey's review is an opportunity to stop "doing what we've always done". It's an opportunity to be the best parents we can be for the children who we take into our care system. Being the best we can be means setting aside differences we may have with our co-parents, and allocating appropriate funding to the task of looking after the child as a priority.
Professionally we grew up, our children's services and child care theory and practice developed, in times of plenty, and by extension, of certainty. We never dreamed we would one day dread the implications of a world where plenty and certainty were not present.
When I started in Residential Child Care 40 years ago there were still a few young people who were spoken of a case of 'failure
With such harsh intolerance towards Islam under the façade of preventing extremism, this will no doubt have a knock-on effect on community cohesion and how Muslims are perceived by the wider non-Muslim public.
There are plenty of positive stories that happen daily in the children's homes. My recent experience has confirmed that you don't have to look hard to find the good news, it's common. Fun, smiles, caring about each other, laughter, understanding, achievement, progress, all of these things happen every day, the same as in any family anywhere. Being a created family is one way of looking at children's homes.