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Most serious cases of fraud were in Afghanistan, Somalia, Syria and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
"All of my friends have been killed," Abdullah* tells me. I'm in Khazer Camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), 30
We can't stop storms or earthquakes. But we can stop disasters turning into crises. In the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, here is a list of five key things to remember during the relief and recovery effort in Haiti.
Since taking up her post a few months ago, Britain's new International Development Secretary, Priti Patel, has been talking up how she's going to crackdown on waste and fraud in the way her budget is spent. In her first speech to a Tory party conference as Secretary of State at the weekend, she continued in this vein, promising to "follow the money" to root out waste and corruption. A laudable ambition which no one can argue with. But what constitutes "waste" seems to depend quite a bit on your overall view of aid.
At Malaria No More UK, we know the importance of sustaining this momentum. We will continue to inspire the public, protect those most at risk and build partnerships with people and organisations who share our vision of a malaria-free world. And to borrow a hashtag from the Global Fund's inspiring replenishment campaign, this time lets stay united to #EndItForGood.
Humility is required, but Britain's generous approach to international aid can be a pillar underpinning whatever new course the UK ends up taking in the world. It wasn't pressure from the EU that led the UK to achieve the 0.7% target - that was home-grown. So, leaving the EU doesn't have to mean a bleak future for Britain's international aid.
When MPs debate the UK's aid target today, I hope we are presented with a full picture of the pros and cons of aid spending. I'm proud that Britain hasn't turned its back on the world's poorest - the fact that the rest of the world has not yet followed suit is a reason to carry on, not retrace our steps. We can and must continue to do better, but there should be no doubt that British aid is transforming the lives of millions of the most vulnerable people on the planet.
Ending the UK's commitment to spend just 7p out of every £10 of our national wealth on international aid is not the answer. This will send the wrong signal to both the countries we are asking to commit to the same spending, and importantly to the hundreds of millions of the world's poorest who we are supporting to lift out of poverty once and for all.
It's so easy to take an education for granted. An education isn't just about learning to read and write - an education opens an entire world of possibilities. It opens up your mind, it unlocks your imagination and it empowers you to make choices that determine your own path in life.
Amid all the recent headlines around the UK's overseas aid, there was one very positive one last week: evidence of tens of millions of lives transformed.