diabetes treatment

everybody banner Most people assume the worst thing about living with type one diabetes is having to inject insulin four times a day. I'm not going to lie, that isn't fun. But for me, without doubt, the most frustrating aspect of daily life with a defective pancreas is testing my blood sugar.
As a type one diabetic, I have to think like a pancreas. Whereas a normal, 'healthy' person's pancreas releases the amount of insulin it needs to regulate the body's blood glucose levels, mine doesn't. For reasons unknown, my immune system destroyed its insulin-producing beta cells - so I have to inject the insulin myself.
We're constantly told to watch what we eat, keep as active as we can, have a healthy lifestyle and manage our weight. But why are these messages so important and what are we all striving to achieve?
Surely you must know the adverse effects of bad diet and no exercise. Why should the taxpayer pay for what is, ultimately, the exercise of your freedom of choice? This is the question that Jeremy Paxman asked the former NHS chief Sir David Nicholson, when Nicholson went to Newsnight to describe his transition from being the head of the NHS to becoming yet another NHS patient with diabetes.
If you have diabetes then, yes, you are less likely to die before your time than you would have been 20 years ago. In the mid-1990s, someone with diabetes was roughly twice as likely to die in any given year as someone without it.They are now one-and-a-half times more likely to die in any given year.
A commonly prescribed diabetes drug increases the risk of bladder cancer, research has found. Patients who use pioglitazone
People who wolf down their food are two times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who chew their food slowly
A fresh study into the connection between diabetes drug Metformin and cancer risks has discovered that the exposure of this
Leading health experts have approved a once-weekly diabetes jab, spelling the end of the current 14 injections a week conducted
Health experts have revealed that a simple, low-calorie diet is the key to beating type 2 diabetes, improving the condition