Digital footprint

With fundamental advances in AI technology, smart cities can have their own digital immune systems that fight threats
With fundamental advances in AI technology, smart cities can have their own digital immune systems that fight threats
As parents we need to make sure our children understand the implications of their digital footprint; being careful about what they post online and respectful of others in the digital world. But it's also vital that we self-regulate our own online habits.
Imagine that all important interview; you've graduated university with a 1st, spent your summer working hard to gather the relevant experience, and you've spent hours doing your research and brushing up on the job, the company and the industry. It's September and it's game time.
For many of us, the hotel is equally as enjoyable as the holiday itself. These days, some rooms even coming equipped with technology such as free WiFi-connected tablet devices, to make us feel at home. But what you might not know is that what you do on this device might stay there for all to see.
In 2013, my own kids just have to be able to scroll back far enough on my Facebook Timeline to see exactly the last time I got horrendously drunk and allowed someone to tag a picture of me (or was too pie-eyed to stop them), or to see me mouthing off about something, dropping the F-bomb all over the place.
If I could spend even seven days, in my own home unplugged from my devices, perhaps I could recapture some of that stillness inside which is so needed to create--to read or write.
One rule (of 33 so far documented) of the living in a digital age is that the internet is written in ink and has "total recall" - once there you cannot take is back and as Zackerberg's sister Randi found out you cannot depend on privacy settings.