digital skills gap

Perhaps, it's the way we are using technology, rather than its presence that is the problem. Here's why we should embrace technology in the classroom and some exciting ways it's already being harnessed to improve learning experiences.
Artificial intelligence, virtual reality, machine learning and the Internet of Things are shifting the boundaries of how we live, work and govern. Yet, the pace at which we are introducing these new technologies does not match our ability as a nation to acquire the digital skills they demand of us.
The Government's Digital Strategy has huge potential, but we cannot expect a 'one size fits all' approach to digital skills provision to deliver the promise of nobody left behind. Instead, organisations must work collaboratively to create diverse programmes for diverse audiences that are inclusive by design, offering support to the few as well as the many.
However, there is also much promise, with productivity gap concerns finally sparking further investment in education and skills to combat the UK's longer-term economic pressures. The key for closing our digital skills gap will be ensuring a significant portion of that investment goes towards STEM initiatives in schools. But where to invest?
One such example is Bristol-based Bookbarn International, which specialises in second-hand and antiquarian books. The company launched as a physical book store back in 2000, but in 2008 started selling on a website and through eBay as well. Today, it has an annual turnover of £1.2m, with up to 85 per cent of this coming from its online business alone.