digital skills

The tech world needs more women, which is why we've recently launched our Girls In Coding campaign. And here are the top six reasons you should learn to code.
It is no secret that this very moment is perhaps the most fortunate time to start a business in recent times, in Britain.
We need new thinkers who are digital natives, not just generating the exciting new intellectual property but being immersed in the technology to create and distribute this to the waiting world.
To be competitive, firms need to streamline processes, raise productivity and meet targets. Yet real innovations often demand a little time dawdling in the slow lane, thinking rather than ticking boxes.
The "technological revolution" is well underway, according to the many stories on this subject scattered throughout the media. It would seem that there is an inevitability about our digital future if you were to adhere to conventional wisdom; although so far there has not been proper examination as to how we are going to cope socially, economically and culturally.
Ever since the British government announced the introduction of computer programming into the school curriculum a year ago, a flurry of organisations have established related initiatives to improve the digital literacy of young people across the country.
Whether we like it or not preconceptions exist and sometimes these preconceptions are based on fact. There aren't women in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and maths) and women don't code. We all know this isn't true but it has certainly been a topic of conversation for a long time.
A quick look round any classroom, workplace, park, bus, or any public space you care to name, and you'll see girls busy with their smartphones, hunched over tablets, or transfixed by their laptops.
If there is one thing that is totally predictable, it's that no-one can foresee what the future holds. So while plans and strategies are essential for any venture, there has to be room for flexibility and adaptability to be successful.
The UK is on the brink of a sea change. When it comes to starting a business, technology has levelled the playing field, opening up new opportunities for young people to drive change. More than half of those in the UK aged 18-25 want to set up their own business and almost one in six are now in the process of doing so, compared with less than one in ten only a year ago.