digital skills

For a long time, the focus has been on how to get your foot on the career ladder and make the transition from education to the workplace. But now employers are increasingly realising that you hold the key to unlocking the digital potential of their business and they're looking to bring you on board.
As the economy shows welcome signs of recovery, Government and businesses are waking up to the fact that digital is a key driving force behind this growth. But, in order to make the most of the digital opportunity, there must be people with the right skills and experience at the heart of our workforce.
With the first signs of economic recovery beginning to look like a reality, business leaders across the UK are entering a new phase of cautious optimism. Manufacturing revenues and employment figures are rising; advertising spend has bounced back to pre-recession levels. For the first time in a long time, there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Young job seekers have skills that large swathes of other workers don't. They are the first generation to have grown up with the internet and have in abundance the digital skills that many employers need. The blogger, the social media manager, the app developer - these three buzz jobs didn't exist 10 years ago.
When I first met Silvana Gambini, who is in her fifties and worked as a careers adviser for 12 years, she had never considered using the internet to earn an income. Like many unemployed women, she used the web to look for work and stay in contact with friends and family through email and Facebook.
As a nation, we need to address our digital skills deficit by giving young people the opportunity to grow their confidence and capitalise on their digital skills and knowledge. Only then will we build a workforce fit for the future, and see young people, business and the British economy thrive.