disability issues

As MPs go back to work this week, we want them to think about disabled people who are unable to take up and progress in employment because of a consistent failure to remove barriers. Scope's analysis of the latest ONS data reveals that for every 100 disabled people moving into work, 114 are leaving. If the UK wants to be a modern, inclusive society, it needs to act urgently - not just pay lip service to an ideal world in which opportunities are equal.
In the UK it costs on average £550 pcm more to live if you are disabled and prejudice remains quite common. Indeed many commentators
Whilst this might seem a strange title for a blog on disability, I count myself incredibly lucky to have had a hidden disability all of my adult life. If I had to choose between invisible and visible, I would choose invisible every time. Why, you ask? It stops the questions. It stops the pity. It stops people thinking you are 'less' of a person because you are in some way deficient.
I believe characters in stories should be as diverse as the people who read them, but only a very small handful of children's books feature a deaf character. There are more than 45,000 deaf children in the UK. Most are born to hearing parents and go to mainstream schools where they may be the only deaf child, so they can feel quite isolated.
While not criticising achievements of ParalympicsGB, might the 11 million people living with disabilities in the UK have been better served by the money invested in the Paralympic GB squad, and what kind of post-Olympic legacy are we to expect from this investment?
So if we accept that emojis are now part of our everyday language and are here to stay, then the need for more diverse emojis is the natural progression of a language that is continuously evolving.
You wouldn't tell someone they cant get up the stairs as you have no lift but direct them to another store that does have one! But this is what our high street household names are effectively doing by expecting someone else to provide a facility they could easily provide for customers that are asking for better facilities. It's time to stop passing the buck and take responsibility.
Here in Uganda, the general attitude towards people living with a disability is negative. They are called "'Kateyemba'", meaning 'The Unable One', suggesting they can't help themselves. It's a nickname that instils a sense of hopelessness in a person. In the African culture, if you bear a child with disability it seems like a curse. Parents ask, "What did I do to deserve such a child?"
When your top typing speed is 50 words per hour, working towards a degree might feel out of reach. Not for Dawn Faizey-Webster
Presented by The Open University
Disabled people don't need praise for accomplishing something that a non-disabled person would, too. They, just like everyone else, should be praised for doing something they enjoy; anyone should be given praise for doing something they enjoy and not letting their own personal difficulties stop them.
My hope on this 20th anniversary is that people will work with us, so that the in the next 20 years we make even greater progress in the equality of disabled people.
Disabled people with extraordinary talents succeed and contribute to the world economy every day.
I get a sense that there are a lot of frustrated people with disabilities, that genuinely feel that their skills and experience are disregarded in the job market because they are seen as purely a number, a tick in a tick box system.
Disability does not discriminate, it can affect you no-matter your age, gender, or ethnicity, and anyone who fits the criteria can apply for a blue badge. I know there are people who abuse the system, but let the authorities deal with these people.
Like many disabled people, I just want access to the same places and products as everyone else, and I hope disabled people feel as encouraged as I do that this report may be the best way in which we can start to access them. So if you are reading this as a disabled person, the next time you feel discriminated against, my advice is to do a Julia Roberts...
What does sadden me is how many young disabled people still feel that a happy love life is out of reach. I started using my wheelchair at the age of fifteen and at the time I was sure I would never find love.
At first glance, Samantha Cleasby looks like your average 33-year-old. But in 2003 she was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel
Of the 10 million people in the UK with some form of hearing loss, 3.7 million are of working age (16 - 64) Have you wondered just how young deaf people manage to lead normal lives? Yes, yes you have.
The teachers were as shocked as the pupils and I might as well have been an alien for outer space as I was certainly the freak of the school. This was clearly a lonely position and I often felt I was the only disabled person within a mile, five miles or even ten miles radius.
Being in a wheelchair means I'm lower down and people tend not to see me. Therefore it's a matter of waiting ages for people to move, or me turning into the Terminator. Whilst most shops are more accessible on entry, it's like a Monaco race track inside. I'm breathing in through every clothes stand, hoping it avoids a wheel from knocking naked mannequins on my head.