disadvantaged children

In our everyday lives, we need to be creative. Things come up that we didn't plan for: problems we didn't imagine we would
Everyone wants to stay constantly connected but at what cost? They're so easy to disguise. Slipping a phone out of a pocket to read a text takes a couple of seconds, but it's a significant distraction. There's the issue of the digital divide.
Life has not always been easy but I have been lucky. I have been educated, supported and informed. I have, for the most part, felt empowered. When I have not, I have been surrounded by friends, family and colleagues who have fought for me. Until I met Lucy, I did not appreciate how lucky that made me.
This is then a reminder, a wake-up call, to (head) teachers and parents. We need to prioritise reading. We need to make time and create environments in which young people chose to read. If we wish to encourage them to read for pleasure, we must be the readers we wish our children to be.
It must surely be time to move on from this anachronistic, condescending paternalism, so neatly reflected in phrases such as 'disadvantaged', 'deprived' and 'from challenging backgrounds'.
Election year is always a time to reflect on where we are as a country and on the things that really matter to us. What do we care about? And what can be done to make things better. As a sportsman and now as a father, I have always believed passionately in the power of sport to improve the lives of young people. I know from my own personal experience and from the achievements of the thousands of youngsters I have encountered throughout my professional tennis career, that sport has transformative qualities.
Shay's story is just one of many helped by your support, and we're constantly working to help more children and young people across the UK. We are currently providing grants to over 2,700 projects and your donations go towards supporting children and young people facing a wide range of disadvantages...
Hayley came to me last autumn with the idea of setting up a summer camp for children from deprived backgrounds. I nodded enthusiastically at her proposal but was frankly sceptical. Jess, co-founder of the camp, points out that students are eager to hatch lofty plans whilst nursing a drink but less inclined to see them through...
The increased aspirations of black pupils are to be applauded as higher education is more likely to lead to successful careers and higher income. Well educated citizens with improved employment prospects, irrespective of ethnic background are highly desirable for the economic development and social stability of any nation.
The analysis of tests undertaken in 2009 has found that on average across OECD countries, disadvantaged students are twice as likely to be among the poorest performers in reading compared to better-off pupils.