djs

It is a well-known fact that the way we listen to music has changed dramatically in recent years. It can probably be traced
Women are under-represented in lots of professions, but music and the arts are generally thought to be areas where there is at least a modicum of equality. In rock music, for instance, the battles have been fought -- and largely won -- over gender parity, a plethora of female musicians (guitarists, drummers etc) proving that women can rock just as well as men.
To jump to the conclusion that it's all down to market forces - that young people just don't want to go to clubs anymore - is ill-informed and misleading. Legendary London venues such as Turnmills, The Cross, Cable, The End and more all closed due to the effects of gentrification and the siren call of property developers - not lack of demand.
I get asked a lot why I still go to nightclubs even though I'm 35 and attached. Er, for the music, of course. I've never been one to view a night out as anything other than a chance to experience a vibe, and get excited about musical trends and the ongoing expansion of dance music, in its many forms.
Picture it. The kitchen radio, a glistening hunk of bakelite, its alignment of valves producing a sound that commanded attention. You're a kid busy hanging onto your mother's skirt as she cooks the evening meal. It's a moment of inspiration.
Channel 4 have unveiled their plans for a rather novel night of TV. The broadcaster, known for taking risks, is set to hand
And if you're feeling peckish- the canapés are divine! The small bite sizes means you can try almost everything on the menu
Our collective, eclectic tastes in music are part of the make up of X-Press 2, that whole ethos of finding new sounds but dipping back into the past is part of what we, as clubbers, dancers, DJs and now producers, have always loved about what we're involved with.