Donating to Charity

From then, each month now has a designated charity aim, with January's 'dryathalon' all the way to 'Stoptober'. Alongside these, people will be engaging in so-called fun runs and comedy nights across the country. What's wrong with that? It's all for a good cause, they say as they proffer their jangling buckets.
For charities working in war zones or countries hit by acts of terrorism, the world can be a dangerous and difficult place. Charities dealing with the humanitarian effects of conflict or political upheaval face the task of making sure help goes to the people who need it most, while not inadvertently supporting armed groups or those involved in terrorism...
In the USA company giving rose by 12% last year to reach an epic $18.2billion. UK companies, by contrast, have shown a sharp decline in giving, down 27% this year - according to a recent report by the Directory of Social Change. So what's the story - why aren't Britain's bosses backing charity?
Perhaps the most difficult challenge for philanthropy is its uneasy relationship with inequality. It is an uncomfortable truth that inequality is pretty much a necessary precondition for philanthropy.
Could you run a marathon? Maybe. How about two straight after each other? Unlikely. But what if you were asked to run seven
Peter Amores is changing the world. Not your world, but the world of young people in Tondo, Manila, one of the Philippines
There needs to be more awareness of the plight of Syrian civilians in order to highlight this issue and further get the aid they so desperately need. The hospitals in Syria are struggling to accommodate the growing number of patients that need medical assistance and care.
A seven-year-old boy who raised more than £2,000 for the emergency services that rescued him, a committed fundraiser who
We like to think of ourselves as a generous nation in the UK - especially with the success of our national fundraising appeals like Red Nose Day and Children in Need. There is a lot of visible giving in this country, from high-street charity shops to fun runs and sponsored stunts. But actually, the culture of giving in the UK is not as strong as we think.
She had not been given a day off in three years and her employers had taken her passport away. She was shouted at, beaten and the children spat at her, hit her and pulled her hair. I asked why she had not left or run away. She said because her boss had told her that without a passport she would be put in prison by the British police for many years and would never see her children.