Donmar Warehouse

Les Liaisons Dangereuses really is such a terrific play. Christopher Hampton's adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos' novel is just so good - full of passion, intrigue, betrayal, loss and gender politics. And all these themes wrapped within this well-known story of a pair of schemers in pre-Revolutionary France.
Hallelujah! Josie Rourke has finally staged an original play written by a woman at the Donmar Warehouse. Until now, all the original works staged during her tenure have been written by men<. But now we have Splendour, an early work from the very talented Abi Morgan (Suffragette, The Iron Lady) and it's a gem.
Occupy London were sent packing three years ago, but the Donmar Warehouse is currently home to Temple, a play exploring what St Paul's Cathedral did when protestors set up camp outside their doors. Why put a play about them on now?
Nicole Kidman is set to get certain pulses racing with news that she is to return to London's West End stage. When she previously
In London the BAME community account for over 42% of the population, so why aren't the actors taking centre stage reflective of that? If the white able-bodied voice is what fronts the majority of the theatre we experience, we are destined to only ever see life from that perspective and no other.
Shakespeare's Henry IV Parts I &II have been compressed and transformed into a two-hour prison drama with an all-female cast in this bold production at the Donmar Warehouse.
That this story is about gay men in the 1980s and that not all of them make it through to the end alive might give the impression that this is a heavy, depressing play. Not at all. In fact, this play is incredibly funny, with moments of real tenderness. I wasn't bored or depressed for a second.
'High art', however intimidating it may seem to the uninitiated - and aren't we all at some point? - can and should be as engaging and powerful as Star Trek and Bollywood was for the young Sajid. And that includes you Marina...
Privacy is a really sharp, relevant play that looks at the frightening impact of mass surveillance. By addressing this vital issue head on, Privacy is unequivocally a play for our time.
Not a play about the French monarchy, Versailles is an ambitious play from Peter Gill that dramatizes the controversial peace treaty that was signed in the French palace at the end of WWI.