dreamland

The world we live in is fast, busy, stressful and full of technology, so really it is no wonder so many adults are looking at going back to basics and living simpler lives. This has been hammered home to me all the more over the summer school holiday when my sons ages six and seven want to sit in front of iPads and watch the television much of the time.
Dreamland sits firmly on Margate's seafront, the gentle decay of its 1930s facade blending into the line of distressed shop fronts along Marine Terrace. It has been closed for over a decade. But June 19 sees the amusement park's re-birth, and with it, the resurgence of a seaside town that, along with many of its ilk, crumbled with the advent of cheap overseas flights in the 1970s.
There is positive form of gentrification going on, and bring it on, because the rebirth of Margate, London's sandy beach is one helluva an uplifting story. Dreamland when it finally reopens this summer will be another milestone and being part of helping this great British seaside town to rediscover its mojo is a responsibility that we are not taking lightly.
After a series of mysterious fires and the unrelated launch of a mega-mall nearby, Margate turned from beloved tourist destination to ghost town - practically overnight. Despite the efforts of high-street hero Mary Portas and the valiant rejuvenation of the Old Town, Margate continues to reek of recession and disrepair.