E-books

It has taken developers 40 years to come up with a way of reading electronically that people enjoy. In the end they had to make the experience as close to that of reading a printed book as possible. People have an emotional relationship to the way they read.
It's an exciting time in digital but as a Brit recently returned to these fair shores as well as an independent author, I have been pondering why the uptake of ebooks and e-readers is so behind America and even Australia. Here are my thoughts.
If you were in a bookshop and picked up a collection by Alice Munro it would cost nothing for you to read a story to see if you liked her work. If you did you would then go to the till and purchase the entire collection.
For the last few weeks I've been on a thriller chase, so to speak, so this week's book, The Uncoupling by New Yorker Meg Wolitzer, is a welcome break, kind of like a soy frap = fluffy, light, and curious.
The riots that raged through the UK earlier this year and the more recent anti-capitalism demonstration at St. Paul's Cathedral have revealed the prescience of Gavin James Bower's second novel, Made in Britain, injecting the book's marketing campaign with a degree of focus it might otherwise have lacked.
The one thing that the Amazon Kindle can't do though is turn non-readers into bookworms. The Kindle Fire may well outsell its book-focused older brother, but those newly ensnared by Amazon's web of content will not immediately be interested in what's been uploaded to Kindle Direct Publishing that week.
Regular users of the Amazon Kindle store will know that their reading options aren't just limited to traditional books. For
In a recent blog post I covered just how successful romance authors can be, so it seemed like a good idea to interview one of the best. Bella Andre is the prolific author of the bestselling Sullivan Family series, as well as the Bad Boys of Football books, along with many others, and she kindly sat down to give me her view on digital publishing, and what lies ahead for her.
It doesn't matter if a book is good in a classical or academic sense. All that now matters is whether or not people want to read it and if they'll pay to do so.
There have been many contenders for the Millennium Series crown, and a hell of a lot of scrabbling within the industry for the next bestselling thriller with characters as memorable as Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist.