e-voting

In an increasingly digital world where demand for online services continues unabated in all walks of life, government and public sector organisations need to embrace cyber voting as standard, providing a complimentary channel to traditional paper and postal voting.
It isn't fair to say that people are "apathetic" or just "don't care" as some commentators may have you believe. These are important elections, important decisions. People do care about the direction of issues such as social care, education, and policing, it's borderline crazy to claim otherwise. So we need solutions, and sustainable ones at that.
I agree that greater democracy is a good thing, not just for unions, but in general. However, I fail to see how introducing a minimum threshold whilst enforcing 20th century postal balloting methods in a 21st Century society is going to bring about that ideal... It is a matter of fairness and progress - if politics and business can benefit from technology and vote online, shouldn't unions be able to?
Whilst you and I will have grown up in the pre-digital age of VCRs, audio cassettes, and encyclopaedias, the 2020 general election will be the first election where there will be a generation of first-time voters who have known nothing other than a lifestyle of digital accessibility.
In a country where 38million of us are socialising online, 36million of us are shopping online, 26million of us are banking online, and 4.5million of us are dating online; it is perhaps unsurprising that 65% of the public are in support of being able to cast their vote online. But what would be the benefits of such a move?
So yes, it is fair to say that our current methods of voting in the UK are incredibly out-dated and simply do not reflect the culture change that has occurred in the Google Generation.
Whilst over two million Scots will be feeling relieved and more than one and half million nursing feelings of disappointment, there will be over half a million Scottish people confessing to having not voted in the independence referendum...
The Internet now reaches into nearly every aspect of our lives. Vast numbers of us routinely bank, shop and socialise online and the public services we all rely on are equally dependent on computers and the Internet. It's also true that the widespread use of social media has provided new ways for citizens to engage with the political process in the countries in which they live.