early intervention

Yet at a time when demand for council children's services is rising, severe Government funding cuts are leaving more children and their families to deal with problems alone. We are really concerned that without additional investment in this vital early support, more families will quickly reach crisis point and the risks for the children involved will grow.
"I've spent most of my life saying I'm fine". That's how Prince Harry started a very honest and candid interview about his
At least 725,000 people of all ages, genders and backgrounds in the UK have an eating disorder. They are extremely serious illnesses, and if left untreated for too long they potentially have long-term physical consequences and may even be deadly - anorexia has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness.
Austerity measures have contributed to the creation of a mental health crisis. The sufferers of mental illnesses are being increasingly left to deal with their conditions on their own instead of being offered the medical treatment which they desperately need.
So while the headlines today are right on the money, let's not lose sight of the elements of this programme that could work and that must form the basis of future programmes to support these vulnerable families across the United Kingdom - including lessons for work in Scotland. If we do, we'll be failing them all over again.
Early identification is everyone's responsibility. With the increased requirement for all school staff to identify a child who is struggling and put the support in place it is ever more important that they have the skills and knowledge they need to be able to do so.
I am optimistic about what early intervention can achieve for people with eating disorders, but early intervention needs to take place earlier.
It's a very challenging problem we face: how do we significantly reduce our spending on crisis care and acute treatment and start investing in tackling the problems that emerge early in children's lives. It will take brave decisions by leaders and commissioners to move in this direction. But we have to start doing it so that children and young people start experiencing the quality outcomes that we as a society should be able to provide for them.
At the school gates parents mellow and become curious about this child's new lease of life. So often, they admit they were aware of problems, but felt it was not their place to become involved. Sometimes, there are genuine concerns for their own safety. But mostly, I am sad to say, it is down to indifference.
Professionally we grew up, our children's services and child care theory and practice developed, in times of plenty, and by extension, of certainty. We never dreamed we would one day dread the implications of a world where plenty and certainty were not present.