east end

In post-Brexit Britain when there will be natural economic uncertainty, our political class and media establishment have an historic obligation to keep our country safe from bigotry by being positive, robust and wise in their discourse.
It's a veritable melting pot of trends, music and culture. The area has produced a diverse array of talent who are widely celebrated today; from esteemed writer (Edgar Allen Poe), to top businessmen (Alan Sugar) and even man-of-the-moment Idris Elba. Local institutions like the 115 year old Hackney Empire has helped provide platforms for this multicultural talent over the years, and the Industrial and Jungle electronic music genres even originated from the area.
Millions were wringing their hands this week in anxiety over the fate of BBC motormouth Jeremy Clarkson. Meanwhile, on the streets of East London on Thursday night the police were cracking down on Class War's sweary summing up of popular sentiment towards our political leaders, to complete indifference of the media.
Living in Bow in the Nineties, just one skyscraper dominated the skyline: ONE Canary Wharf. I would see it when I went to bed every night and when I woke up in the morning. With steam pouring from its air conditioning ducts through the night like some steam punk dragon, it winked knowingly at the council estates it towered over. It knew there was worse to come...
Seventy-four years on, the heroism and sacrifice of these young men is the stuff of legend, romanticised and steeped in patriotism. So often portrayed with the iconic RAF moustache, the majority were probably too young to even have a moustache. Who were these men? How do they remember the Battle of Britain and what became of those who survived the years of war? What happened when they stopped being pilots, stepping out of uniform and back into civilian life?
"The music business has become dull," says Jah Wobble. "It's like one big heritage site. I avoid it like the plague because it's full of businessmen bores, a lot of whom are too old to try anything else. It's a dead zone."
These haunting shots of derelict East London pubs tell of the decline of the once thriving local hostelry. Captured by photographer
Ordinary people and scenes of east London in the 1960s snapped by world famous photographer David Bailey are to go on show
Images of East End characters snapped by world famous photographer David Bailey have been put on show for the first time
Pane is a man's man. He's on a level. A tattooed and bearded dope chef that speaks to guys deeper than any lads mag.