ebola

An Ebola vaccination has been confirmed as safe and highly effective, after a 100 per cent success rate in clinical trials
An experimental vaccine tested on humans has been found to provide 100 per cent protection against the deadly Ebola virus
The same prediction model previously predicted Zika and Ebola.
A list of the 37 viruses which pose the greatest threat to populations around the world has been revealed by scientists. It
Last week Sierra Leone marked the first anniversary of the declaration of the end of the Ebola outbreak by the World Health
International Day of the Girl Child is about standing with girls like Isatu so that she can create the future she wants for her daughter. It serves as an important reminder to all of us to examine gender inequality in our own communities and our global community. Tackling these problems won't just benefit girls, it will benefit everyone.
Nurse Pauline Cafferkey, who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone in 2014, has been taken to hospital
Reducing corruption...would represent a significant and direct benefit for a substantial number of Sierra Leone's people - more money in their pockets, improved access to services that are vital in the literal sense of the word, and the satisfaction of knowing they can be part of the solution to the problem.
In wars and disaster zones, a simple explanation is that humanity is a force that advances the idea of life, with dignity. To strengthen the idea of humanity for people caught in conflicts, epidemics and disasters, we could borrow some ideas from the Olympic motto: Citius (faster), Altius (higher) and Fortius (stronger).
What these films and shows don't highlight is the amount of data analysis that would need to go on in the background in real life. Let's take Containment to start with: how would they know how much of the city to cordon off?
In summer 2014, a social media campaign successfully encouraged millions of people to dump buckets of ice-cold water over
In Sierra Leone, fashion designer Jenneh Mason is best known for frocks and fashion shows. She also dreams of public playgrounds, lots of them, dotted all across the country bringing safe places to play for children who are unlikely to have ever seen one, imagined one or even understand the concept of safe play.
It's 3pm in central Monrovia, Liberia. Crowds of noisy, staggering men congregate around the outside of a collapsing, rotten three story building in the drizzling rain.
So today when Parliament debates whether Britain should keep its recent commitment to devote 7 pence in every £10 of our national wealth to aid, we will be confidently declaring, alongside politicians from all sides of the House, that we are #ProudOfAid.
A lack of belief in the legitimacy of the WHO is a big problem for the success of the Health Emergencies Programme and the future of the institution. Unless member states such as the UK believe that the WHO has the legitimacy and ability to act in response to health emergencies, funding for ambitious life-saving programmes will not be forthcoming and the WHO will remain an institution of must-dos without action.
It is in all our interests to find a cure for corruption in sports and in the wider world. If we fail to act as decisively as we need to, we will watch as it spreads, infects and destroys like a deadly virus.
One year on from the end of Ebola, life in hot, dusty Dolo's Town is still fragile and hard. The legacy of this vicious disease will be felt for years to come. The pain and grief is still tangible, but there is a cautious op-timism that, with the right investment and support, things are starting to look up.
It is worth noting that the impact of the outbreak was not just restricted to public health consequences. There are also social and economic issues, such as stigma associated with surviving infection and an estimated USD$2.2 billion lost in economic growth during 2015 across the three countries where the virus took hold.
The rows of white tents that used to house patients at the Ebola Treatment Centre in the Moyamba District of Sierra Leone have been disinfected and taken away, and the smell of smoke and chlorine that once filled the dusty air has faded... This time last year, the centre was on the frontline of the fight against Ebola.