ecommerce

According to Startup Britain, a remarkable 80 new businesses were born every single hour in the UK last year, with 325,000 new companies registering between January and June alone. These are incredible figures and I am incredibly proud to say that my e-commerce venture can be included in them. I am also incredibly proud to say that I. Am. Female.
But in the UK, it's not just high profile dates like Black Friday and Cyber Monday that are driving sales in the run up to Christmas: last year, Mondays proved the busiest online shopping days of the week (post-Cyber Monday) ahead of Christmas Day. After all, who doesn't fancy a touch of festive retail therapy to brighten up a dreary Monday morning?
We don't need to look too hard to uncover some of the motivation between these frequent m-shopping trips. Social media feeds are awash with inspirational images and every product imaginable. This means that every day, shoppers are flicking through catalogues-worth of products, styled and validated by their friends as well as an army of digital influencers that comprise their online network.
Ask most people what their overriding feeling is these first few days back in the office after Christmas and their response is unlikely to be 'optimism'. As Britain collectively shakes off its hangover, heads to the gym and wakes up in darkness, we can all be forgiven for a bout of the January blues.
Murmurs trending that the online market site, Taobao, is supported by these quiet female shopaholics as a form of activism. Whether or not we're being too quick to place political idealization on a opportunistic convergence of the times, Taobao's wealthy owner Jack Ma is now worshipped as a deity.
We love online shopping. As well as the thrill of being able to shop for anything, anywhere, anytime, now we can receive
The launch of Handmade this month drives Amazon into the complicated world of selling individually crafted items with varying quality and pricing strategies. More importantly it pushes Amazon directly into a realm that is already occupied by retail aggregators such as Etsy and Folksy.
I have an alarm clock that works out the best time to wake me up so I don't destroy it, I have a program running on my desktop that automatically adjusts the redness in my screen to prevent glare at night. Yet I have an inbox stuffed full of messages that haven't changed since the days of Hotmail and AOL.
As Apple Pay reaches the UK, we have to ask ourselves the question, will we ever shop the same way again? The way we shop
What do Apocalypse Now, Escape from Alcatraz, and online shopping have in common? Surprisingly to some, all had their seminal